Stories that fly

Jeremy from Essexville, asks:

Why do Canadian airport codes start with the letter “Y”?

The U.S. National Weather Service initially established airport codes. Canada was allotted a “Y” for all airports associated with a weather office. Codes like YVR for Vancouver and YWG for Winnipeg make sense, but Canada’s busiest airport, Toronto Pearson International Airport, inherited the intriguing YYZ. Some travel companies use the non-standard YTO to identify Toronto, but it’s actually a city code that encompasses not only YYZ but also YKZ (Buttonville Municipal Airport) and YTZ (Toronto City Centre Airport). You may also see the odd “Z,” such as in ZBF for Bathurst, New Brunswick.

Other questions answered byDoug Morris:

Rathish from Toronto, ON:

When do pilots get to rest during long haul flights?

There are additional pilots for all flights over 9 hours, so there are usually three or four pilot crew members for lengthy trips. All the pilots are in the flight deck from the time the aircraft departs until it levels off in cruise mode, and then again when the aircraft begins descent upon arrival. The […]

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Joey from Montreal, QC:

How did you end up becoming a pilot?

There are generally three paths to follow in becoming an airline pilot in Canada: flight colleges, military and flying clubs. Many think the military is the road most travelled here in Canada. Not so; in fact it’s the least. However, in the United States the opposite tends to be the norm. I chose to learn […]

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Rathish from Sherwood Park, AL:

How do you become a pilot for Air Canada?

If you visit Air Canada’s site you’ll find their minimum requirements for pilots. (There you’ll also see a small article I wrote…”A Day in the Life.”) An application must be submitted on line with HR (Human Resources) who is responsible for selecting the candidates. The website states the minimum requirement is 1500 hours of flight time, but […]

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In this issue

Air-Canada-enRoute-December-2017

  • Game On: How Montreal Wins at Winter